Course Offerings by Department

 
Religion

Bible Information Class (BIC)

To assure the student and the faculty that the student has been instructed in basic doctrine, knows the way of salvation, and is ready to schedule on of the other religion courses offered in the next school year.

This course will:
•    Familiarize the student with Scripture
•    Familiarize the student with Christina discipleship
•    Assure the student that Jesus loves them

Religion 9

A study of God’s Word in the Old Testament history books of Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, Judges, and Ruth. We will also discuss the importance of reading the Bible and having a strong devotional life. We will also familiarize ourselves pertinent teen topics, such as dating, problem solving, and choices, in the light of God’s Word, and growing in our knowledge of God’s Love leading us to be witnesses.

Religion 10

A study of God’s Word in the Old Testament history books of 1 & 2 Samuel, 1 & 2 Kings, 1 & 2 Chronicles, as well as the New Testament Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. We will also gain a deeper understanding of the historical liturgy and the Lutheran worship service, familiarize ourselves with the Intertestamental Period, consider the importance of Christ’s command to all believers in the Ministry of the Keys and Confession, and see what our Lord has to say to us regarding the sacraments of Baptism and Holy Communion.  

Religion 11

An in depth look at the spread of God’s Word by the early Christian church and missionary journeys of Paul through the study of Acts and selected Epistles. We will discuss what God has to say about marriage and fellowship. We will also familiarization with Mormonism.  

Religion 12

Religion 12 is the study of God’s Word as spoken to us in the Bible.  Religion 12 focuses on the following books of the Bible: Romans and Revelation.  Religion 12 also provides instruction in the following topics:  justification, Bible interpretation, conversion, end times, fellowship, mission work, Islam, history of Lutheranism and Christian apologetics.

English

ESL

ESL is a class focused on helping the incoming international student gain proficiency in English communication in school and daily life.  The class focuses on speaking and listening activities, writing projects, the reading of student-level English literature, and various grammar concepts to help students gain the necessary skills and confidence in English to succeed in academic and social life in the United States.

English 9

English 9 is a course that focuses on language skills in a variety of areas.  Five pieces of literature featuring several different genres and settings make up that portion of the course. The class also focuses on correct grammar use, especially on the parts of speech, and gives an introduction to writing both formal, academic prose and creative writing projects.  An introduction to public speaking and a few opportunities to practice those skills in class form a short unit of the class as well.

English 10

English 10 is an overview of general literature, an introduction to speech course, and a means to continue building written communication skills.  This is one step in the goal of preparing students for college.
•    Literature—We will look for patterns in human behavior as we strive to understand our world through the study of literature.
•    Composition—We will communicate our thoughts in clear detail using standard English.
•    Speech—We will begin speaking in front of an audience with the intention of slowly building skills and confidence as the year progresses.

English 11

English 11 builds on skills learned and developed in English 9 and 10, including literature, grammar, writing, and poetry.  The novels in this course include some of the most well-known and influential American titles and authors.  Grammar study focuses on more of the nuances of the English language, building off a good knowledge of the parts of speech.  Poetry is both written and analyzed, and formal prose writing is interwoven with the study of literature.

 

English 12

English 12 is a general overview of mostly British literature as well as a means to polish communication skills already introduced in previous English classes, such as writing and speech.  The course is meant to prepare students for college-level work.

 

Social Studies


World History

World History is a thematic—and mostly chronological—study of both western and eastern civilizations.   We will study the course of world civilizations from ancient times through the Enlightenment, looking to see God’s hand in history and what lessons we can learn from other civilizations.+
This course will:
•    Allow students to see how God has arranged world history for His purposes—even in civilizations that do not know or acknowledge Him.
•    Help students use multiple sources and points of view to understand how a person’s perspective will affect his or her view of culture and history.
•    Improve students’ ability to research and present material.
•    Prepare students for college-level history classes through challenging tests and assignments.


American History

Students will study American History from the Revolutionary War through present day with emphasis on 20th century American History beginning with the two World Wars and their impact on present society.  Students will also work to stay informed on History in the making by monitoring current events.
•    HIS-STORY is God’s Story.  We will see how God has guided the course of history for His purpose.
•    Learning History helps you evaluate the past, talk about the present, and guide you for the future.
•    Learning American History makes you informed citizens of the land to which all of you are a part of.
•    Meet the people of all ethnic groups who preserved the freedoms you have today through their blood, sweat, and tears.

Geography

Geography allows us to peek into the wonderful world of God and His marvelous creation.  In this Geography class we will have the opportunity to meet and appreciate people of different cultures other than your own.  You will also be introduced to location, place, human/environmental interaction, movement, and region (5 Themes of Geography).

Government

American government is an introductory course that focuses on the functions, people, and process of the representative democracy of the United States.  The class provides some historical background as to how and why the United States has the government system it does, an explanation to the main concepts of the Constitution, a detailed look at the roles of the three branches of national government, an walk-through of the American democratic process, especially regarding elections for public office, a short study of forces that impact government, and a brief look at the relationship between local, state, and national government.

AP U.S. Government and Politics

AP Government is an overall study of the foundation, institutions, and policies of United States government in preparation for the Advanced Placement U.S. Government and Politics exam.  Students are not required to take the test even though they are enrolled in the class.

Mathematics


Algebra 1A

We are going to be learning the first seven chapters of the Algebra 1 book.  The rest of the concepts will be learned in Algebra 1B.  These basic mathematical skills are required to pursue other courses in math.  They are also used somewhat often in the world around the student.

This course will:
•    Help students see God’s hand in Creation
•    Allow students to perform basic mathematic equations
•    Prepare students for more advanced levels of mathematics

Algebra 1B

Algebra 1B is designed as a flexible, student directed Algebra course in which lessons and concepts are directly taught by the instructor, but at the pace of the individual student. Concepts of Algebra 1A will be reviewed and mastered, and new concepts will be taught and practiced to prepare students for further Mathematics courses.

The purpose of Algebra 1B is to provide one-on-one, specific instruction of algebraic skills.

a.    Students will review and extend mathematics skills at their own pace.
b.    Students will prepare for additional mathematics courses by mastering the skills of Algebra.
c.    Students will apply mathematics skills to real-life situations.

Algebra 1

Algebra I is a tool used to study God’s orderly creation.  Through the thorough study of functions, preparation is made for future coursework in mathematics.  Algebra I is an important building block in the study of high school mathematics and beyond.

Mathematics is a tool and a gift through which we can study God’s creation.  Algebra I is a class designed to prepare students for future math work in Geometry, Algebra II, Pre-Calculus, Calculus and beyond.  The content of Algebra I is organized around families of functions, with special emphasis on linear and quadratic functions.  As students learn about each family of functions, they will learn to represent them in multiple ways – as verbal descriptions, equations, tables, and graphs.  They will also learn to model real-world situations using functions to solve these problems.  Students also will use writing to communicate their mathematical ideas throughout the course and in specific projects.  Graphing calculators are required and are used extensively throughout this course.

Geometry

Cartesian Coordinate Geometry and Mathematical Proof writing.  Students will study topics such as congruence and similarity as well as be exposed to the basic properties of lines, triangles, quadrilaterals, and circles.  There will be numerous examples involving algebra, data analysis, and probability.  Proof writing form and development will be studied in depth as students learn to organize their thoughts and provide sound reasoning.

Algebra 2

Linear Algebra - Students will study the linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, radical, and rational functions and will learn to represent them in multiple ways – as verbal descriptions, equations, table, and graphs.  In addition students will be exposed to probability and data analysis as well as numerous examples and exercises involving geometry and trigonometry.

Pre-Calculus

Pre Calculus is a tool used to study God’s orderly creation.  Through the thorough and advanced study of the twelve basic functions, technology, and real data, preparation is made for future coursework in mathematics, especially Calculus.  

Mathematics is a tool and a gift through which we can study God’s creation.  Pre-Calculus is a course in which we are given the opportunity to do so.  Topics in Pre-Calculus build upon the concepts of Algebra and Geometry.  Graphing technology is integrated throughout this course and is an essential tool for both mathematical discovery and effective problem solving.  Thus, a graphing calculator is required for this course. A balance of algebraic, numerical, graphical, and verbal methods of representing problems can be found throughout the course.  The twelve basic functions (Identity, Squaring, Cubing, Reciprocal, Square Root, Exponential, Natural Logarithmic, Sine, Cosine, Absolute Value, Greatest Integer and Logistic), effective communication, and applications to real data are also emphasized.  Writing is used throughout Pre-Calculus to convey mathematical ideas and concepts as well as in special projects.


AP Calculus

AP Calculus is a tool used to study God’s orderly creation.  Through inquiry, investigation, graphing techniques, technology, and real data, students will investigate and learn the beginning topics of Calculus.

The content of this course will include topics common to the study of beginning Calculus.  Students will be able to grasp the concepts of functions, limits, derivatives, and antiderivatives after successfully completing this course.  Understanding and communicating these ideas are keys to success in this course.  Basic “regurgitation” of theorems and formulas is not the focus.  Rather, ideas will be investigated using numerical, graphical, algebraic (analytical) and verbal techniques.

Group work on various problems is also encouraged.  Cooperative learning is a great way to work together to share ideas and benefit from each other’s learning.  

Learning Calculus can be the most stimulating and exciting educational experience because it is the basis for much of mathematics and explains many great wonders of the modern world.  Through the study of Calculus we will hope to gain a greater appreciation for the wonderful and orderly world God has created for us.  He has given and blessed us with many tools to better investigate and explain His creation.  The students will use one such tool, Calculus, to do just that.
 

Science

Biology

Biology is an introductory Life Science course required at the freshman level.  This course fulfills all of the required Life Science state standards for high school students in Nebraska, while studying creation in the light of God’s Word.   Biology covers the four main components for high school Life Science: the structure and function of living systems, heredity (genetics or the inheritance of traits), ecology (the flow of matter and energy in ecosystems), and biodiversity (the differences between organisms and the effects that they have on each other within an ecosystem).  The course content will be reinforced through a variety of activities including class and group work, lab investigations, projects, homework, and tests/quizzes. This class fulfills one of the three required science credits for NELHS.

Physical Science

Physical Science is a general science course elective for students who have completed freshman Biology.  Physical Science covers two main areas of the science discipline:  physics and chemistry. The goal of the course is to teach scientific concepts and skills by applying the scientific method and laboratory equipment.  The course content will be reinforced through a variety of activities including class and group work, lab investigations, projects, homework, and tests/quizzes. This class fulfills one of the three required science credits for NELHS.
Physical Science focuses on two fields:  physics and chemistry.  Physics includes the study of scientific laws of motion, thermodynamics and energy.  Chemistry focuses more on the molecular world, including the study of the properties and changes that matter can undergo, as well as the organization and function of atoms, molecules, mixtures and the like.  Underlying all of these chapters is the unifying theme of organization and purpose for the various theories and laws observed in science.  Reactions do not happen by chance. Energy and motion do not function because of random causations, rather, they are a direct result of the purposeful design of a Creator God. 

Physics

Physics is a physical science elective available to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  This course fulfills the Nebraska physical science high school state standards for the studies of force, motion, and energy.   The topics that will be covered in this Physics course include: motion in one dimension, two-dimensional motion and vectors, forces and the laws of motion, work and energy, rotational motion and the law of gravity, rotational equilibrium and dynamics, heat, vibration and waves, light reflection and refraction, interference and diffraction, electricity and magnetism, and subatomic physics.  The course content will be reinforced through a variety of activities including class and group work, lab investigations, projects, homework, and tests/quizzes. This class fulfills one of the three required science credits for NELHS.

Chemistry

Chemistry is a Physical Science elective available to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  This course fulfills the Nebraska Physical Science high school state standards for the study of matter.  The course content will be reinforced through a variety of activities including class and group work, lab investigations, projects, homework, and tests/quizzes. This class fulfills one of the three required science credits for NELHS.

This course will:
•    Teach students how matter is classified and investigate those states of matter.
•    Explain atomic theory and structure.
•    Describe the relationship between chemical bonds and molecular shapes.
•    Use the periodic table as a resource to examine the physical and chemical properties of selected elements and their families.
•    Identify the different types of chemical reactions and the factors that affect chemical reaction rates.
•    Teach students how to write and balance chemical reactions and apply the mole concept to stoichiometry of chemical reactions.
•    Investigate the nature and use of catalysts.
•    Work with the properties and reactions of acids and bases.
•    Apply the preparation and properties of solutions.
•    Describe chemical equlibria.

Earth Science

Earth Science is a science elective course available to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.   This course fulfills all of the required Earth Science state standards for high school students in Nebraska.   Earth Science covers four main components: Earth in Space, Earth Structures and Processes, Energy in Earth’s Systems, and Earth’s History (in accordance with God’s Word).  The course content will be reinforced through a variety of activities including class and group work, lab investigations, projects, homework, and tests/quizzes. This class fulfills one of the three required science credits for NELHS.

Earth Science covers topics including geology (the solid earth), oceanography (liquid earth), meteorology (the atmosphere) and astronomy (the universe beyond earth).  The purpose of this course is to gain an understanding of the structure and function of properties of the earth and of space, describe changes that occur to the earth and to space over time, and to see all of these phenomena as direct results of the purposeful design of our Creator God. 

Fine Arts

Freshman Music

A survey of music from diverse cultures around the world.  It is an active study of how music shapes who we are as human beings and how we express ourselves through music.  Students will be provided opportunities to create, perform, listen to, and analyze music.  
This course will:
•    Introduce students to music from other cultures
•    Instill in students an appreciation for other cultures’ music
•    Prepare students to be lifelong “musicians” in God’s church
•    Show students what role music plays in their lives and the lives of others

Band

Band is designed for percussion and wind instrument students to have the opportunity to refine their performance skills as individuals and as an ensemble.  Students without instrumental experience may gain membership to the band after basic study of an instrument has been completed.
The students will:
•    Perform alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music;
•    Develop individual and ensemble skills through daily practice;
•    Gain an appreciation of musical style, history and basic music theory through analysis, discussion and by relating music to other disciplines;
•    Develop appropriate stylistic performance practices for each music genre.

Concert Choir (Fr/So) (Jr/Sr)

A non-auditioned, curricular mixed choir (SATB) that performs as part of the curriculum at all major school concerts and also may sing in Chapel as occasion permits.
The students will:
•    Use his or her gift of vocal music to God’s glory and praise singing both sacred and secular choral
literature (I Cor. 10:31 – “So whether you eat or drink or whatever you do, do it all for the glory
of God.”  Ps. 104:33 – “I will sing to the LORD all my life; I will sing praise to my God as long
as I live.”)
•    Put his or her musical talents to faithful use to improve his or her vocal skills, sight reading ability
and knowledge of music theory and music history through choral performances (Matt. 25:14-30 –
The Parable of the Talents: “Well done, good and faithful servant! You have been faithful with a
few things; I will put you in charge of many things. Come and share your master's happiness!”)
•    Learn and prepare a body of choral literature for concerts which is representative of varied
historical periods and styles, and which promotes and extols God and His Word in both text (sacred and secular) and music (Ps. 27:6b – “I will sing and make music to the LORD .”; 33:1-3 – “Sing joyfully to the LORD , you righteous; it is fitting for the upright to praise him. Praise the LORD with the harp; make music to him on the ten-stringed lyre. Sing to him a new song; play skillfully, and shout for joy”)
•    Be prepared to continue singing the following school year in Knights of the Round Table or any college choral program.

Knights of the Round Table (KRT)

An auditioned, curricular mixed choir (SATB) that sings at all major school concerts and travels to Association congregations to participate in worship services as an outreach tool for the school.
The students will:
•    Use his or her gift of vocal music to God’s glory and praise singing both sacred and secular choral
literature (I Cor. 10:31 – “So whether you eat or drink or whatever you do, do it all for the glory
of God.”  Ps. 104:33 – “I will sing to the LORD all my life; I will sing praise to my God as long
as I live.”)
•    Put his or her musical talents to faithful use to improve his or her vocal skills, sight reading ability
and knowledge of music theory and music history through choral performances (Matt. 25:14-30 –
The Parable of the Talents: “Well done, good and faithful servant! You have been faithful with a
few things; I will put you in charge of many things. Come and share your master's happiness!”)
•    Learn and prepare a body of choral literature for concerts which is representative of varied
historical periods and styles, and which promotes and extols God and His Word in both text (sacred and secular) and music (Ps. 27:6b – “I will sing and make music to the LORD .”; 33:1-3 – “Sing joyfully to the LORD , you righteous; it is fitting for the upright to praise him. Praise the LORD with the harp; make music to him on the ten-stringed lyre. Sing to him a new song; play skillfully, and shout for joy”)
•    Be prepared to continue singing the following school year in Knights of the Round Table or any college choral program.

Art (repeatable)

A comprehensive art experience with detailed exploration in painting, drawing, sculpture, and crafts.  Students will learn about the history, analysis, and interpretation of art.
The students will develop in these four areas
•    Making art (art production)
•    Responding to and making judgments about the properties and qualities that exist in visual forms (art criticism)
•    Acquiring knowledge about the contributions artists and art make to culture and society (art history)
•    Understanding the nature, meaning and value of art (aesthetics)

Physical Education

Freshman Health

Health is designed to create a comfortable, Christ-based atmosphere for students to learn about their bodies, real-life challenges, and the proper way to live a God-pleasing life.
a.    Students will define specific health terms and concepts regarding the human body and how it works.
b.    Students will empathize with those who have struggled with health-related issues, and develop skills to combat some of those same issues.
c.    Students will understand that their body is a temple of the Holy Spirit.
d.    Students will develop a sense of responsibility in maintaining a healthy body.

Sophomore Physical Education


NELHS physical education is based on intellect, social development, skills, body, and movement. Physical education is information learned about our God-given human body, its movement, and the skills that the human body is capable of performing. Everything we do is to be done to the glory of God.
Strength Training
A class that will challenge students to grow in muscular strength, muscular endurance, cardiovascular endurance, speed, agility, and flexibility.
Students will improve their physical fitness and strength levels through various workout plans, exercises, and activities.  Students will be exposed to current fitness programs like P90X, Insanity, and the Bigger, Faster, Stronger lifting program.   The students will be able to identify certain ways to improve strength in a specific area of the body, and will practice leading a healthy and active lifestyle.

Foreign Language

Spanish 1

This course provides an introduction to the language and culture of the Spanish-speaking world.  Basic grammar, vocabulary, speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills are learned.  Students also learn about the various and distinct cultures that make up Spain and Latin America.  A large amount of this course will be taught in the target language of Spanish.  A student can best learn a new language by being exposed to it as much as possible.
The students will:
•    Read, Write, and Speak at a basic level.
•    Know the countries of the Spanish-speaking world and their differences.
•    Marvel at God’s wisdom in the way he has diversified the globe through different languages and cultures.

Spanish 2

This course will review and build on the skills learned during first year Spanish.  We will seek to improve our abilities in the four main components of a language: writing, reading, speaking, and listening.  
The students will:
•    Speak at an intermediate level.
•    Write at an intermediate level.
•    Read at an intermediate level.
•    Understand the differences that exist between the cultures of different Spanish-speaking countries.
•    Marvel at God’s wisdom in the way he has diversified the globe through different languages and cultures.

Spanish 3

This course will review and build on the skills learned during first two years of Spanish.  We will seek to improve our abilities in the four main components of a language: writing, reading, speaking, and listening.  
The students will:
•    Speak at a conversational level.
•    Write at an intermediate advanced level with help of a dictionary.
•    Read at a junior high level.
•    Understand the differences that exist between the cultures of different Spanish-speaking countries.
•    Marvel at God’s wisdom in the way he has diversified the globe through different languages and cultures.

Spanish 4

This course will continue to build on the skills learned during the first three years of Spanish study.  We will seek to improve our abilities in the four main components of a language: writing, reading, speaking, and listening.  
The students will:
•    Speak at a conversational level.
•    Communicate their thoughts through writing with the help of a dictionary.
•    Read at a high school level.
•    Understand the differences that exist between the cultures of different Spanish-speaking countries and those present in our own country.
•    Marvel at God’s wisdom in the way he has diversified the globe through different languages and cultures.

Vocational Education

Computer Applications

Computer Applications and Digital Citizenship - Students will study the basics of computer operations including operating systems, typical office applications, social media, digital citizenship, e-mail, web design and basic computer science concepts.

Digital Media

Digital Media is a course designed to allow students to extend and apply their artistic abilities using technology. Throughout the course, the school yearbook is developed and finalized.

The purpose of Digital Media is to guide students in their creativity and expression of art in a technological course. New skills will be used, templates designed, design principles discussed, and photography practiced in real life settings.

Psychology

This course focuses on individual behavior and why an individual thinks, feels, and reacts to certain stimuli.  Major emphasis is placed on research methods, stages in childhood and adolescence, how the brain works, altered states of consciousness, psychological testing, and psychological disorders.
This course will:
•    Teach students to view their body as a spectacular gift from God
•    Encourage students to view psychology not only from a worldly viewpoint, but also from a Christian’s perspective
•    Discuss different theories of Psychology

The students will:
•    Identify major contributors to the field of Psychology
•    Explain basic methods of psychological research
•    State, label, and describe basic parts and functions of the human brain and compare and contrast functions of the brain’s hemispheres
•    Describe the research related to sleep and dreams
•    Break down and illustrate the principles and techniques surrounding classical and operant conditioning
•    Explain the various views of intelligence

Life Skills

An introduction to managing your personal finances, starting a family and childbirth.
This course will:
•    Teach students to view money as a gift from God and to be good stewards of the gifts he has given us
•    Encourage students to make good decisions about their money
•    Review the miracle of life from conception to birth
•    Discuss different styles of parenting
      
The students will:
•    Analyze their spending, saving, and giving habits
•    Gain a basic knowledge of banking and how to manage their money
•    Plan and create a budget based on their future occupation
•    Experiment with the “stock market”
•    Understand the stages from conception to birth and possible complications